Mood
 
 
 
 
Mood

In this lesson you will learn the definition of mood and study examples of mood.
Mood Definition
  • Mood:
  • shows the attitude of the speaker
  • Includes the following:
  • indicative mood
  • used to express facts, opinions or to make inquiries
  • the most commonly used mood and is found in all languages
  • imperative mood
  • expresses commands, direct requests, and prohibitions
  • in many circumstances, directly using the imperative mood seems blunt or even rude
  • subjunctive mood
  • also called the conditional mood
  • rarely used except in certain situations
  • has several uses in dependent clauses
  • used when discussing hypothetical or unlikely events, expressing opinions or emotions, or making polite requests
  • often found in complex sentences
  • used after wishing or requesting verbs or to express unreal conditions in dependent clauses
  • typically used in a dependent clause attached to an independent clause containing one of the following verbs: ask, command, demand, insist, order, recommend, require, suggest, wish
  • typically used in a dependent clause attached to an independent clause containing one of the following adjective: crucial, essential, important, imperative, necessary, urgent
  • The present tense subjunctive is formed by dropping the "s" from the end of the third person singular
  • paints-paint, thinks-think, walks-walk, is-be (exception)
  • The past tense subjunctive and the past tense indicative are the same
  • painted-painted, thought-thought, walked-walked, was-were (exception)
Mood Examples
  • indicative mood
  • I paint the house.
  • Jane read the book.
  • I wrote the letter.
  • imperative mood
  • Paint the house.
  • Read the book.
  • Write the letter.
  • subjunctive mood
  • I wish that I had a million dollars.
  • If you had been more motivated, you would have finished your homework.
 
Grammar Tips
Can You Catch These Native Speaker Mistakes?
(Beginner - Listening)

An audio lesson to help with your understanding of common mistakes. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Commonly Confused Words: Part One
(Beginner - Listening, reading)

A video lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words.
The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed.
Click here to visit the lesson page.
Commonly Confused Words: Part One
(Beginner - Listening)

An audio lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Commonly Confused Words: Part Two
(Beginner - Listening, reading)

A video lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words.
The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed.
Click here to visit the lesson page.
Commonly Confused Words: Part Two
(Beginner - Listening)

An audio lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
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  Resources

These links contain many English learning resources. Some are for students, some are for teachers. If you find information not on Fun Easy English, please post a comment below, and I will make every effort to add it to the site. Thanks.
 
 
 
 
 
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