Let's Teach English
 
 
 
 
Let's Teach English Unit 8

The Let’s Teach English video series offers free online training for English language educators worldwide. It is based on the Women Teaching Women English text for adult, beginning level learners. Voice of America and the University of Oregon are partners on this project.
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Unit 8: Visual Literacy

This lesson teaches students to work with a timeline graphic to show events in time order. They base the timeline on the hopes and dreams they remember from different periods of their lives. Creating timelines helps students develop visual literacy for academic charts and graphics.

Then, they play a game called ‘Wheel of Futures.’ This lets students try out different future plans and possibilities and explain why or why not they may want to do these things. The game format makes learning fun and helps students think about their plans from a new perspective. It may also help reduce stress or anxiety around talking about possible future options.
Teacher Preparation Video

This episode shows a model of teaching using a timeline and talking about plans for the future.
Let's Teach English Unit 8
Video Transcript

Narrator: This lesson teaches students to work with a timeline graphic to show life
events in order. They base the timeline on the hopes and dreams they remember from different periods of their lives. Creating timelines helps students develop visual literacy for academic charts and graphics.
 
Teacher: This is a timeline.

(The teacher points to a poster with a timeline divided into five sections: Age 6, Age 16, Age 26-46, Age 66-86, and Age 86-106.)

Teacher: It is a way to tell a story about something, like a person’s life.

Mimi: Oh, yes, I saw that in a museum.

Teacher: Exactly. You have some cards with answers about me. And you can guess what age they are for. Julia.

Julia: Can we put them on the timeline?

Teacher: Yes. Are you ready to guess?

Students: I'd love to guess! Yeah! Yes.

Teacher: Okay, let’s begin. Show your cards to each other.

(Each student has a card and holds it up to show the other students. Jamie’s card says “Animal Doctor.” Emma’s card says “Chef.” Maryam’s card says “Teacher.” Julia’s card says “Mother.” Mimi’s card says “President of the U.S.”)

Teacher: Okay, what did you guess for Age 6?

Julia: I think Mother goes there.

(Julia gets up and puts the “Mother” card on the timeline at Age 6.)

Teacher: Good guess! But, watch where I put the Mother card.

(The teacher moves the card from the Age 6 spot to the 26-46 spot instead.)

Teacher: I was not ready to have children until then.

Jamie: Maybe it was Animal Doctor for Age 6.

Teacher: Yes.

(Jamie gets up and puts the “Animal Doctor” card on the Age 6 part of the timeline.)

Teacher: Now, how about President of the United States?

Mimi: Age 6 too?

(Mimi gets up and puts the “President of the U.S.” card on the Age 6 part of the timeline.)

Teacher: They go well together, don’t you think?

(The teacher and students laugh.)

Teacher: Okay, there are two more cards, Teacher and Chef. Where do they go?

Maryam: You are a teacher now, so we can put that card in 26-to-46 also.

(Maryam gets up and puts the “Teacher” card on the Age 26-46 part of the
timeline.)

Emma: Is Chef your plan now? Or, is it something for the future?

(Emma holds up the “Chef” card.)

Teacher: Yes, for the future.

(Emma gets up and puts the “Chef” card on the Age 66-86 part of the timeline.)

Maryam: But, there is nothing for 16.

Teacher: That’s also true. I didn’t know what I wanted to be at 16.

Teacher: How does my timeline look?

Julia: Oh, I see. Things are in a line with the young age at the start and the old age at the end.

(Julia points to the timeline.)

Teacher: Yes.

Teacher: Now, put the cards with information about your partners on your timelines.

(The teacher hands the timelines out to the students.)

(Students work together, talking and putting their stickie notes on their timelines.)

Teacher: Okay! Next, we will play a game to help us fill in our hopes and dreams for the future. Take a turn and spin the wheel.

(Jamie spins the wheel and it lands on “fly a plane.”)

Jamie: There are many notes!

Teacher: Yes. Pick one of the notes.

Jamie: I pick “fly a plane.”

Maryam: Jamie, are you afraid?

Jamie: No, I’m not afraid. I would like to fly a plane. Maybe start with a small one.

Maryam: You are very brave! Okay, then, let’s put it on your timeline at Age 26-to46.

(Maryam places the “fly a plane” stickie note on Jamie’s timeline.)

Teacher: Okay! Great! Now take turns. Let’s see how many things you can add to your timelines.

(Students continue spinning and adding more stickie notes on their timelines.)

Jamie: Climb a mountain.

Emma: 16.

Maryam: 16? Yes.

Teacher: You put a lot of good future ideas on your timelines. What did you learn about your classmates?

Julia: Mimi and I both want to be engineers!

Emma: Yes, but there also are many different things we want to do.

Mimi: For the future, some of us would like to try new things. I got some new ideas from the game and from other people in the class.

Maryam: Yes, I will be brave. My dream is to learn to fly a plane too!

Narrator: Summary: The "Wheel of Futures" game lets students try out different future plans and possibilities and explain why they may or may not want to do these things. The game format helps students think about their lives from a new perspective. It may also help reduce anxiety caused by talking about their futures. Next time, join us for Unit 9. We will teach vocational language.
Transcript Vocabulary

graphic (noun) – a picture, drawing, or graph used as a decoration or to make
something such as a magazine article easier to understand

timeline (noun) – a line that includes marks showing when particular events
happened in the past

visual literacy (noun) – the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from
information presented in the form of an image

© 2017 University of Oregon and Voice of America. This work is based on the Women Teaching Women English materials produced by the University of Oregon American English Institute under U.S. Department of State Federal Assistance Award S-LE200-10-GR-050, issued by the U.S. Embassy Beirut.
 
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