Past Participle Adjective
 
 
 
 
Past Participle Adjective

In this lesson you will watch a past participle adjective video, learn the definition of a past participle adjective and study examples of past participle adjectives.
Past Participle Adjective Video
 
Past Participle Adjective Definition
  • A past participle adjective:
  • indicates a past or completed action or time
  • is formed from a verb using the perfect aspect and the passive voice
  • does not take an object
  • is often called the -ed form
  • often has the same form as the simple past of the verb
  • Note: only transitive verbs can use their past participles as adjectives
Past Participle Adjective Examples
  • The bored student.
  • The confused class. (all the students)
  • The chicken has eaten. (perfect aspect)
  • The chicken was eaten. (passive voice)
  • The following words are past participle adjectives
  • verb - present participle - past participle
  • aggravate - aggravating - aggravated
  • alarm - alarming - alarmed
  • amaze - amazing - amazed
  • amuse - amusing - amused
  • annoy - annoying - annoyed
  • appall - appalling - appalled
  • astonish - astonishing - astonished
  • astound - astounding - astounded
  • bewilder - bewildering - bewildered
  • bore - boring - bored
  • calm - calming - calmed
  • captivate - captivating - captivated
  • challenge - challenging - challenged
  • charm - charming - charmed
  • comfort - comforting - comforted
  • compel - compelling - compelled
  • confuse - confusing - confused
  • convince - convincing - convinced
  • depress - depressing - depressed
  • devastate - devastating - devastating
  • disappoint - disappointing - disappointed
  • disgust - disgusting - disgusted
  • distract - distracting - distracted
  • distress - distressing - distressed
  • disturb - disturbing - disturbed
  • embarrass - embarrassing - embarrassed
  • enchant - enchanting - enchanted
  • encourage - encouraging - encouraged
  • entertain - entertaining - entertained
  • excite - exciting - excited
  • frighten - frightening - frightened
  • humiliate - humiliating - humiliated
  • infuriate - infuriating - infuriated
  • inspire - inspiring - inspired
  • insult - insulting - insulted
  • interest - interesting - interested
  • intimidate - intimidating - intimidated
  • intrigue - intriguing - intrigued
  • mislead - misleading - misled
  • mystify - mystifying - mystified
  • overwhelm - overwhelming - overwhelmed
  • please - pleasing - pleased
  • puzzle - puzzling - puzzled
  • refresh - refreshing - refreshed
  • relax - relaxing - relaxed
  • reward - rewarding - rewarded
  • satisfy - satisfying - satisfied
  • shock - shocking - shocked
  • sicken - sickening - sickened
  • startle - startling - startled
  • surprise - surprising - surprised
  • tempt - tempting - tempted
  • terrify - terrifying - terrified
  • threaten - threatening - threatened
  • tire - tiring - tired
  • welcome - welcoming - welcomed
  • worry - worrying - worried
Past Participle Adjective Cartoon Video
 
Past Participle Adjective Cartoon Video Information
  • The -ing form of the verb expresses the cause of the feeling.
  • The -ed form of the verb expresses the result.
  • In the case of the verb "to bore" Akira said she is BORING which means Akira is actually BORING and not the class.
  • Akira should say because this class is BORING, I am BORED, or simply I am BORED.
  • The class is the cause of her feeling, so it is described with an -ing form, in this case BORING.
  • Her feeling, or the result, is described with an -ed form, in this case BORED.
  • Basically you should remember that things can only be described with the -ing form because things cannot produce feelings.
  • People can be described with either the -ing or -ed forms because they can produce feelings in other people or experience feelings themselves.
 
Grammar Tips
Can You Catch These Native Speaker Mistakes?
(Beginner - Listening)

An audio lesson to help with your understanding of common mistakes. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Commonly Confused Words: Part One
(Beginner - Listening, reading)

A video lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words.
The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed.
Click here to visit the lesson page.
Commonly Confused Words: Part One
(Beginner - Listening)

An audio lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Commonly Confused Words: Part Two
(Beginner - Listening, reading)

A video lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words.
The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed.
Click here to visit the lesson page.
Commonly Confused Words: Part Two
(Beginner - Listening)

An audio lesson to help with your understanding of commonly confused words. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Cool Stuff
Online Reference
Dictionary, Encyclopedia & more
Word:
by:
Confused?

Found a word in Fun Easy English you do not know?
1. Type the word in the Online Reference window
2. Click Look it up (opens to a new window)
Top Hits

Listen to American music while you study.
1. Click The ► button
2. Enjoy some great music
Resources

These links contain many English learning resources. Some are for students, some are for teachers. If you find information not on Fun Easy English, please post a comment below, and I will make every effort to add it to the site. Thanks.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Site Links Site Content Contact My Other Sites
About
Site Map
Copyright
Classroom
Grammar
Reductions
Idioms
Slang
Alphabet
ABC 4 Kids
Pronunciation
Reading
Vocabulary
Acronyms
Videos
Surveys
Tests
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Google
Howie Hayman
English Global Group
San Diego California Events
Tanegashima Japan
Japanese Language Culture Food
Akikos Kitchen
Shai Hayman