Fun Easy English Classroom April 23
 
 
 
 

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Learn American
English reduction
gotcha
American English Reduction "gotcha"

Today in the Fun Easy English classroom you are going to learn "gotcha" an American English reduction.
Hey if you cannot understand something on this page,
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Reductions: "gotcha"

American English reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • This American English reduction is formed when you combine and reduce the following words.
  • gotcha = got + you
  • This American English reduction is used in the following way.
  • I already gotcha some new clothes.
  • This American English reduction has the following meaning.
  • I already got you some new clothes.
Examples: "gotcha"
  • She gotcha a new pair of pants.
  • (Meaning: She got you a new pair of pants.)
  • He gotcha more of your favorite dessert.
  • (Meaning: He got  you more of your favorite dessert.)
  • He gotcha a ticket to the show.
  • (Meaning: He got you a ticket to the show.)
  • She gotcha drunk again.
  • (Meaning: She got you drunk, intoxicated, again.)
  • I actually gotcha a lot more money.
  • (Meaning: I actually got you a lot more money.)
From YOUR Teacher: Gotcha

This idiom is used often in native English conversations.
Note: Reductions

Remember the following:
  • Reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • Reductions, such as gotcha are not real words in English.
  • You need to use reductions in order to sound more natural.
  • You need to know reductions in order to understand conversations between native English speakers.
  • Reductions are used extensively in American TV, movies, music, literature, and in conversations among native English speakers.
Reductions in Music and TV


Jessica Mauboy - Gotcha

Songwriters: Ilan Kidron / Jessica Hilda Mauboy / Louis Schoorl
Gotcha lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Jessica Hilda Mauboy (born 4 August 1989) is an Australian R&B and pop singer, songwriter and actress. Born and raised in Darwin, Northern Territory, Mauboy rose to fame in 2006 on the fourth season of Australian Idol; she became the runner-up and subsequently signed a recording contract with Sony Music Australia. After releasing a live album of her Idol performances and briefly being a member of the girl group Young Divas in 2007, Mauboy released her debut studio album, Been Waiting, the following year. It earned Mauboy her first number-one single "Burn", became the second highest-selling Australian album of 2009, and was certified double platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA).

This video is a good example of the usage of "gotcha", an English language reduction.

Use a dictionary to look up words you do not understand.
Lyrics

Bang bang heat it up,
Fill my cup I'm filling up
Double done, I'm zipped up
Oh oh oh oh
I'm feeling, I'm feeling your love.
Uh uh yeah
OK, bring my girls,
Time for pussycats to purr
You just have to wait your turn,
Oh oh oh oh
Cause we're running, running the world.
Oh oh oh oh
Oh oh oh oh
Gotcha gotcha gotcha
By the collar and you're coming with me.
Oh oh oh oh
Oh oh oh oh
Gotcha gotcha gotcha
In my pocket where I want you to be.
So you got all the cash
And the big kick stash
And your car's all waxed
Oh oh oh oh
But it's all just an act!
Here we go!
High beams turned on,
We do the impossible
That kind of feelin' you just soar
Are you feeling the feeling my love?
Oh oh oh yeah!
Oh oh oh oh
Oh oh oh oh
Gotcha gotcha gotcha
By the collar and you're coming with me.
Oh oh oh oh
Oh oh oh oh
Gotcha gotcha gotcha
In my pocket where I want you to be.
Oh, you're beating hard to my door
Oh, you're banging feet to the floor,
Oh, the world turning to gold,
Gold gold gold gold
Oh oh oh oh
Oh oh oh oh
Gotcha gotcha gotcha
By the collar and you're coming with me.
Oh oh oh oh
Oh oh oh oh
Gotcha gotcha gotcha
In my pocket where I want you to be.
I gotcha where I want you to be!
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • Conversation Lesson - Intermediate Level. Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language with a written conversation and a conversation notes section.
Conversation Lesson 1 - Greetings
(Intermediate - Conversation, Reading)

Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language.
Greetings

Acquaintances

Matt: Good morning.

Maxine: Good morning. How are you today?

Matt: Just fine, thanks. How are you?

Maxine: Wonderful. Things couldn’t be better.

Good Friends

Dotty: Hi. What’s up?

Vivian: Nothing much. What’s new with you?

Dotty: Not too much. I’ve been pretty busy.

Vivian: Me too. Seems like all I do is eat and sleep.

Dotty: Gotta go. Call me tonight.

Vivian: Okay. Check you later.

Family

Mother: Good morning.

Son: Morning. What’s for breakfast?

Mother: The usual. Eggs, toast, and cereal. Coffee, if you want.

Son: I think I’ll just have cereal for a change.

Mother: Help yourself. The cereal and sugar are on the table. The milk’s in the refrigerator.
Conversation Notes
  • Acquaintance
  • a person one knows but not a close friend
  • Things couldn’t be better
  • Everything is going well
  • Hi
  • informal way to say hello
  • What’s up
  • What’s new? Used informally
  • pretty
  • rather, somewhat
  • Me too
  • has meaning of I have been busy, too
  • Seems
  • It seems
  • Gotta
  • I’ve got to = I must
  • Check you later
  • I’ll call you later
  • What’s for breakfast
  • What are we having for breakfast?
  • just
  • only
  • Help yourself
  • Serve yourself
Source: U.S. State Department
Additional Conversation
Conversation

This is a collection of 30 situational conversations which focus on a wide variety of communicative and natural encounters in English....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

This is a collection of 30 situational conversations. Each conversation is accompanied by language notes....these lessons are for advanced students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 52 lessons covering pronunciation, speaking, writing, and grammar topics....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 30 lessons focusing mostly on communication and grammar topics....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Cool Stuff
Online Reference
Dictionary, Encyclopedia & more
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2. Click Look it up
Top Hits

Listen to American music while you study.
1. Click The ► button
2. Enjoy some great music
       
  Resources

These links contain many English learning resources. Some are for students, some are for teachers. If you find information not on Fun Easy English, please post a comment below, and I will make every effort to add it to the site. Thanks.
 
 
 
 
 
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