Fun Easy English Classroom June 23
 
 
 
 

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Learn about
degree adverbs
Degree Adverbs

Today in the classroom you are going to learn about degree adverbs an important part of English grammar.
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Grammar: Degree Adverbs

Definition of a degree adverb.
  • A degree adverb:
  • answers the question, How much?
  • increases or decreases the effect of a verb describes to what degree, level, or extent something is done
  • is also known as a quantity adverb
  • Like all adverbs, degree adverbs can refer to a verb, an adjective or another adverb
  • When they refer to an action they are usually placed before the verb expressing that action
  • She is almost done.
  • If they are meant to modify an adjective or another adverb they are placed before the adjective or the adverb they modify
  • They know each other very well.
  • I am quite sure he can manage on his own.
  • The adverb of degree enough means "to the necessary degree" and it is placed after adjectives and adverbs
  • Is your cocoa sweet enough?
  • You didn't try hard enough.
  • When enough is used with an adjective it can be followed by:
  • for somebody/something
  • The room is big enough for three people.
  • You are not qualified enough for this job.
  • to + infinitive
  • She is old enough to vote.
  • Sarah is crazy enough to do it.
  • When enough is placed before a noun it no longer functions as an adverb, but as a determiner meaning "as much as it is necessary"
  • We don’t have enough money to refurbish our home.
  • You have enough firewood.
  • The adverb of degree too means "more than is necessary or useful" and it is placed before adjectives and adverbs
  • You are too kind.
  • She ate too much cake.
  • When too is used with an adjective it be followed by:
  • for somebody/something
  • This car is too sporty for you.
  • The actress you recommended is too old for this role.
  • to + infinitive
  • You are too young to have a cell phone.
  • Their report was too long to be read at the meeting.
  • The adverb of degree very is placed before an adjective or an adverb to intensify the meaning
  • The documentary on global warming was very interesting.
  • Kids learn languages very easily.
  • Not very can be used to give a negative connotation to an adjective or an adverb
  • She was not very helpful.
  • They are not very happy.
  • James does not learn very quickly.
  • She did not do very well in her driving test.
  • Very versus Too
  • When we use very, we make a statement and simply state a fact
  • It is very good.
  • He speaks very quickly.
  • When we use too, we tend to make a subjective statement and imply there is a problem
  • They walk too quickly.
  • i.e. they are walking so fast that we can't keep up
  • It is too good to be true.
  • i.e. too good to be true; I don't believe it and I think there's a problem
  • Learn the adverb spelling rules
Degree Adverb Examples
  • I completely agree with you.
  • She is extremely busy.
  • She is almost done.
  • They know each other very well.
  • I am quite sure he can manage on his own.
  • Is your cocoa sweet enough?
  • You didn't try hard enough.
  • The room is big enough for three people.
  • You are not qualified enough for this job.
  • She is old enough to vote.
  • Sarah is crazy enough to do it.
  • You are too kind.
  • She ate too much cake.
  • This car is too sporty for you.
  • The actress you recommended is too old for this role.
  • You are too young to have a cell phone.
  • Their report was too long to be read at the meeting.
  • The documentary on global warming was very interesting.
  • Kids learn languages very easily.
  • She was not very helpful.
  • They are not very happy.
  • James does not learn very quickly.
  • It is very good.
  • He speaks very quickly.
  • They walk too quickly.
  • It is too good to be true.
  • She did not do very well in her driving test.
  • He is totally prepared for his job.
  • I am too tired to play baseball tonight.
  • He is totally exhausted from the trip.
  • Is there enough wine?
  • She can hardly sing.
  • The following words are degree adverbs
  • almost, completely, enough, entirely, extremely, hardly, just, little, much, nearly, partially, quite, rather, scarcely, too, totally, very
Fun Easy English Grammar Lessons
From YOUR Teacher: Degree Adverbs

Although degree adverbs can describe quantity they do not state an exact amount. They simply describe a relative amount to make the reader or listener know approximately how much.
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • Conversation Lesson - Advanced Level. Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language with a written conversation and a conversation notes section.
Conversation Lesson 26 - At the Pet Store
(Advanced - Conversation, Reading)

Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language.
At the Pet Store

CONNIE: Oh! What a beautiful cat. What do you think?

GARY: I think I’d rather get a dog. Dogs are more loyal than cats.

CONNIE: Yes, but they’re so much work! Would you be willing to walk it every single day? And clean up after it?

GARY: Hmm. Good point. What about a bird? Or a fish?

CONNIE: We’d have to invest a lot of money in a cage or a fish tank. And I don’t really know how to take care of a bird or a fish!

GARY: Well, we’re obviously not ready to get a pet yet.

CONNIE: Yeah, you’re right. Let’s go grab some coffee and talk about it.
Conversation Notes
  • Oh! What a beautiful cat “Oh!” is used to show surprise or excitement. “What a …” is an expression that means “I think this is a very …” “What a(n) …” is followed by an adjective, which is usually emphasized. Notice the emphasis on “beautiful” here.
  • Dogs are more loyal than cats. Two things are being compared here (dogs and cats). Notice the structure of the sentences: (noun/s) plus “is/are more” plus (adjective) plus “than” plus (noun/s). The nouns and the adjective are content words here, so they are all emphasized.
  • Every single day Notice that each word here is stressed. The speaker wants to make a point, so she emphasizes each word equally. “Every single day” is a lot!
  • Good point here means “I agree with you.”
  • Take care of This phrase is used with animals, people and things. It can mean “watch a child while her parents are away,” “feed and house someone or something,” or “make sure things work properly.” (I always take care of my baby brother./ I take care of my bird by feeding it and cleaning its cage./ I need to take care of the broken sink.)
  • Yeah, you’re right. Notice the pronunciation of this expression — the words all blend together here. This casual expression is used to agree with someone that you know well.
Source: U.S. State Department
Additional Conversation
Conversation

This is a collection of 30 situational conversations which focus on a wide variety of communicative and natural encounters in English....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

This is a collection of 36 situational conversations which focus on spoken American English in a relatively natural way....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 52 lessons covering pronunciation, speaking, writing, and grammar topics....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 30 lessons focusing mostly on communication and grammar topics....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Additional Information
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(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
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