Fun Easy English Classroom June 24
 
 
 
 

Classroom
Today


American English
pronunciation
lesson 22
American English Pronunciation Lesson 22

Today in the classroom you are going to learn to pronounce the sound b as in the words bet, but, bit, beach. Remember "practice makes perfect" if you want to improve your English speaking ability.
Hey if you cannot understand something on this page,
then use the Fun Easy English dictionary (opens in a new window)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Pronunciation: American English Lesson 22

Pronounce the sound b as in the words bet, but, bit, beach. Watch the following pronunciation videos and learn to pronounce this sound correctly.
 
Pronunciation Video
Fun Easy English Pronunciation Lessons
More Videos
Spelling
b bet, bass, bat, but, bit, bunch, boring, bony, beach, bill, best, beak, back
 
Note: the red letters all have the same sound
 
Sound Type

This is a VOICED sound which means Your Vocal Cords DO vibrate when making this sound.
You CAN LISTEN to your Vocal Cords vibrating if you cover your ears with your hands.

Try covering your ears with your hands as Akiko is doing in the picture.

Now make the sound of this lesson. Can you listen to your vocal cords vibrating?
VERY GOOD
You CAN FEEL your Vocal Cords vibrating if you place your hands on your neck.

Try placing your hands on your neck as Akiko is doing in the picture.

Now make the sound of this lesson. Can you feel your vocal cords vibrating?
VERY GOOD
The following diagram shows the most important parts of your head and mouth used for pronouncing the sounds of English. It also shows the location of your Vocal Cords.
 
Mouth, lips, and tongue position

The following descriptions explain the proper mouth, lips, and tongue position when you make this sound.
Mouth

Your mouth releases air which is then quickly stopped.
Lips

Your lips are together at the beginning.
Tongue

The front part of your tongue should be in the center part of your mouth.
Practice video

Listen to the video and practice repeating each word.
 
 
Pronunciation practice words

Look at your mouth in a mirror and practice pronouncing the following words. Make sure your mouth, lips, and tongue are in their proper positions.
bet bass bat but
bit bunch boring back
beach bill best beak
 
Note: the red letters all have the same sound (watch the video above)
 
Pronunciation word test

Try saying the following tongue twisters as quickly as possible.
  • Betty Botter bought some butter. / "But," she said, "this butter's bitter! / If I put it in my batter, / It will make my batter bitter!" / So she bought a bit of butter / Better than her bitter butter, / And she put it in her batter, / And her batter was not bitter. / So 'twas better Betty Botter / Bought a bit of better butter.
  • Peggy Babcock.
  • The black bloke's back brake block broke.
  • Toy boat [repeated]
  • Rubber buggy bumpers [repeated]
  • Toy boat. Toy boat. Toy boat.
  • A bitter biting bittern Bit a better brother bittern, And the bitter better bittern Bit the bitter biter back. And the bitter bittern, bitten, By the better bitten bittern, Said: "I'm a bitter biter bit, alack!"
  • I cannot bear to see a bear Bear down upon a hare. When bare of hair he strips the hare, Right there I cry, "Forbear!"
  • A box of biscuits, a batch of mixed biscuits.
  • A big black bug bit a big black bear, made the big black bear bleed blood.
  • The boot black bought the black boot back.
  • Black bug's blood.
  • Betty better butter Brad's bread.
  • Brad's big black bath brush broke.
  • Betty and Bob brought back blue balloons from the big bazaar.
  • A bloke's back bike brake block broke.
  • Good blood, bad blood.
  • Brisk brave brigadiers brandished broad bright blades, blunderbusses, and bludgeons -- balancing them badly.
  • The blue bluebird blinks.
  • Pretty Kitty Creighton had a cotton batten cat. The cotton batten cat was bitten by a rat. The kitten that was bitten had a button for an eye, and biting off the button made the cotton batten fly.
  • Ruby Rugby's brother bought and brought her back some rubber baby-buggy bumpers.
From YOUR Teacher: To B or not to B

No this is really not a lesson about Shakespeare but simply a little joke about pronouncing the letter B in English.
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • Conversation Lesson - Advanced Level. Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language with a written conversation and a conversation notes section.
Conversation Lesson 27 - Giving Your Opinion
(Advanced - Conversation, Reading)

Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language.
Giving Your Opinion

JAKE: Where should we take a vacation this year? Let’s decide soon.

MELISSA: Well, I’d like to go somewhere warm. How about the beach? Or we could rent a cabin on the lake.

JAKE: You want to go to the beach, again? I want to ski this winter. How about a compromise? What about traveling to the Alps in Europe next April? We can find a ski resort on a lake.

MELISSA: Oh, we’ve never been to Europe before! But I don’t know if it will be sunny and warm then. I need to do some research first. That will help me make up my mind.
Conversation Notes
  • Decide is a useful verb to express choice. The idiom “to make up my mind” also means “to decide”: “There are so many choices in this menu. It’s going to take awhile to make up my mind/decide.” You can finish this sentence with either the idiom or the verb “decide.”
  • How about This phrase presents an alternative. This phrase can be followed by a subject plus a conjugated verb or by a noun: How about we go swimming? / How about a movie tonight?
  • Many verbs express opinions: to think / to believe / to suppose / to assume, etc. They are not all synonymous. For example, “to suppose” and “to assume” express that the speaker has a preconceived idea: He came back late from work, so I assumed that traffic was bad. /I suppose that may not have been the case, and that he might just have had a lot of work.
Source: U.S. State Department
Additional Conversation
Conversation

This is a collection of 30 situational conversations which focus on a wide variety of communicative and natural encounters in English....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

This is a collection of 36 situational conversations which focus on spoken American English in a relatively natural way....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 52 lessons covering pronunciation, speaking, writing, and grammar topics....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 30 lessons focusing mostly on communication and grammar topics....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Cool Stuff
Online Reference
Dictionary, Encyclopedia & more
Word:
by:
Confused?

Found a word you do not know?
1. Type the word
2. Click Look it up
Top Hits

Listen to American music while you study.
1. Click The ► button
2. Enjoy some great music
       
  Resources

These links contain many English learning resources. Some are for students, some are for teachers. If you find information not on Fun Easy English, please post a comment below, and I will make every effort to add it to the site. Thanks.
 
 
 
 
 
Site Links Site Content Contact My Other Sites
About
Site Map
Copyright
Classroom
Activities
Idioms
Alphabet
Surveys
About America
Pronunciation
Conversation
Slang
Alphabet Kids
Tests
Citizen America
Reductions
Videos
Vocabulary
Environment
Acronyms
Drive America
Grammar
Reading
Listening
Study
Portmanteau
Travel America
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Google
Howie Hayman
English Global Group
San Diego California Events
Tanegashima Japan
Japanese Language Culture Food
Akikos Kitchen
Shai Hayman