Fun Easy English Classroom June 8
 
 
 
 

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English reduction
whaddaya
American English Reduction "whaddaya"

Today in the Fun Easy English classroom you are going to learn "whaddaya" an American English reduction.
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Reductions: "whaddaya"

American English reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • This American English reduction is formed when you combine and reduce the following words.
  • whaddaya = what + are + you
  • This American English reduction is used in the following way.
  • Whaddaya doing tonight?
  • This American English reduction has the following meaning.
  • What are you doing tonight?
Examples: "whaddaya"
  • Whaddaya planning to take in college?
  • (Meaning: What are you planning to take in college?)
  • Whaddaya thinking right now?
  • (Meaning: What are you thinking right now?)
  • Whaddaya going to do tomorrow?
  • (Meaning: What are you going to do tomorrow?)
  • Whaddaya planning to do with your girlfriend this weekend?
  • (Meaning: What are you planning to do with your girlfriend this weekend?)
  • Whaddaya going to paint?
  • (Meaning: What are you going to paint?)
Fun Easy English Reductions Lessons
From YOUR Teacher: New York Accent

This English language reduction is used often especially in places like New York. If you travel to New York you might listen to a native English speaker shout out "Hey, whaddaya doing" to someone if they are angry.
Note: Reductions

Remember the following:
  • Reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • Reductions, such as whaddaya are not real words in English.
  • You need to use reductions in order to sound more natural.
  • You need to know reductions in order to understand conversations between native English speakers.
  • Reductions are used extensively in American TV, movies, music, literature, and in conversations among native English speakers.
Reductions In Music and TV


Chris Stapleton - What Are You Listening To?

Christopher Alvin Stapleton (born April 15, 1978) is an American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and record producer. He was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and grew up in Staffordsville, Kentucky, until moving to Nashville, Tennessee, in 2001 to pursue a career in music writing songs. Subsequently, Stapleton signed a contract with Sea Gayle Music to write and publish his music.

This video is a good example of the usage of "whaddaya", and "whatsiz" English language reductions.

Use a dictionary to look up words you do not understand.
Lyrics

I put that record on
Girl, you know what song
And I let it play again and again
You're in every line
Takes me back in time
Yeah, tonight I'm wondering
Whaddaya listening to?
Is it a cover band?
In some college town bar
Where it's na, na, na's
And air guitars
Or is it?
Something to get you through
Just a sad song playing on the radio station
Tears still falling
Heart's still breaking
'Cause you're hanging on
Or is it a love song?
About someone new?
Whaddaya listening to?
I like to believe
That you're just like me
Trying to figure out how a good thing goes bad
I don't know
I can't let it go
Yeah, it's about to drive me mad
Whaddaya listening to?
Is it a cover band?
In some college town bar
Where it's na, na, na's
And air guitars
Or is it?
Something to get you through
Just a sad song playing on the radio station
Tears still falling
Heart's still breaking
'Cause you're hanging on
Or is it a love song?
About someone new?
Whaddaya listening to?
Is it a feel good song
Gets you driving too fast
The one that gets you moving
On past the past
Or the kind that you can't help singing along
Singing woah-oh-oh-ohhh
If it's headphones on
On a downtown train
Or the window seat
On an outbound plane
Is it LA sunny?
Or Memphis blue?
I wish I knew
I wish I knew
Whaddaya listening to?
Is it a cover band?
In some college town bar
Where it's na, na, na's
And air guitars
Or is it?
Something to get you through
Just a sad song playing on the radio station
Tears still falling
Heart's still breaking
'Cause you're hanging on
Or is it a love song?
About someone new?
Whaddaya listening to?
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • Conversation Lesson - Advanced Level. Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language with a written conversation and a conversation notes section.
Conversation Lesson 11 - At the Doctor’s Office
(Advanced - Conversation, Reading)

Dialogs for everyday use. Short situational dialogs for students of English as a Foreign (EFL) or Second (ESL) Language.
At the Doctor’s Office

DOCTOR: What seems to be the problem?

CATHY: Well, I have a bad cough and a sore throat. I also have a headache.

DOCTOR: How long have you had these symptoms?

CATHY: About three days now. And I’m really tired, too.

DOCTOR: Hmm. It sounds like you’ve got the flu. Take aspirin every four hours and get plenty of rest. Make sure you drink lots of fluids. Call me if you’re still sick next week.

CATHY: OK, thanks.
Conversation Notes
  • What seems to be the problem? means “What is the problem?” Notice that the intonation falls at the end of the question. The doctor wants information, not a “yes/no” answer.
  • Well is used as an introductory word. Notice how the vowel is drawn out, to sound like “Weeeeeell …” This can be used as a way to “buy time” while you think about what you want to say next.
  • A bad cough … a sore throat … a headache: Notice the article “a” before each symptom.
  • About is used to mean “more or less.” It’s used here to give an estimate of time.
  • Take aspirin … get rest … Make sure … Call me: Notice the doctor uses the simple tense here to give instructions. This is the imperative form of the verb.
  • Still sick means “continue to be sick.”
Source: U.S. State Department
Additional Conversation
Conversation

This is a collection of 30 situational conversations which focus on a wide variety of communicative and natural encounters in English....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

This is a collection of 36 situational conversations which focus on spoken American English in a relatively natural way....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 52 lessons covering pronunciation, speaking, writing, and grammar topics....these lessons are for beginning students.
Conversation

English conversation lessons. 30 lessons focusing mostly on communication and grammar topics....these lessons are for intermediate students.
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.