Fun Easy English Classroom January 18
 
 
 
 

Classroom
Today


Learn the differences
between American
and British English
American vs. British English

Today in the Fun Easy English classroom you are going to learn about and listen to the differences between American and British English and watch a few really cool movie trailers.
Hey if you cannot understand something on this page,
then use the Fun Easy English dictionary (opens in a new window)
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Video: American vs. British English
 
Video Script: American vs. British English

Hi. In the classroom today you will learn some differences between American English and British English.

Anyone who has studied English in America and in the United Kingdom knows the differences between American and British English.

These differences can be confusing to someone who is beginning to learn English.

Many movies such as the newer James Bond movies use both American and British English.

American English tends to be faster and more difficult to understand.

In addition, American English uses a lot of slang, idioms, and reductions.

British English is generally easy to understand but not as widely spoken.

The spelling of many words is different such as the American spelling of COLOR as opposed to the British spelling of COLOUR.

Pronunciation is often different and even completely different words are used to describe the same thing.

It is important to understand the differences between American and British English.

Until next time.
 
Video: James Bond Movie Trailer with British English
GoldenEye. In the film, Bond fights to prevent an arms syndicate from using the GoldenEye satellite weapon against London in order to cause a global financial meltdown. Many movies such as the newer James Bond movies use both American and British English. Try to listen for the differences.
 
Video: James Bond Movie Trailer with British English
Tomorrow Never Dies. Bond tries to stop a media mogul from engineering world events and starting World War III. Many movies such as the newer James Bond movies use both American and British English. Try to listen for the differences.
 
Video: James Bond Movie Trailer with British English
The World Is Not Enough. The film's plot revolves around the assassination by Renard of Sir Robert King and Bond's subsequent assignment to protect King's daughter, Elektra, who had previously been held captive by Renard. During his assignment, Bond unravels a scheme to increase petroleum prices by triggering a nuclear meltdown in the waters of Istanbul. Many movies such as the newer James Bond movies use both American and British English. Try to listen for the differences.
From YOUR Teacher: My Favorite English

What is my favorite English? American English of course. I am originally from Buffalo, New York and I speak with a very standard American English accent. Why is American English my favorite? I think it is the easiest to understand and learn due to the wide use of American English in the media including Hollywood movies, television, radio, newspapers, and magazines. Yup I know some of you out there will post some comments about this. Go ahead. It is always nice to know the thoughts and opinions of others.
 
Survey: What is your favorite English?

Everyone has a preference for learning a certain English dialect.
Pick your favorite English on the survey below
and post a comment at the bottom of this page.
From YOUR Teacher: The Longest Page in the World

The following test is 100 questions which made this a very long page.

Can you take the entire test?

If you make it to the end, post a comment at the bottom of the page. lol.
 
Test: American vs. British English

This is a test of your understanding of the differences between American and British English. There is a total of 100 questions. For each question decide if the word in bold print is American or British English? Good luck.
1.  flat, apartment?

     a.  American
     b.  British
2.  chips, crisps?

     a.  American
     b.  British
3.  movie, film?

     a.  American
     b.  British
4.  cackhanded, clumsy?

     a.  American
     b.  British
5.  lift, elevator?

     a.  American
     b.  British
6.  garden, yard?

     a.  American
     b.  British
7.  detour, diversion?

     a.  American
     b.  British
8.  truck, lorry?

     a.  American
     b.  British
9.  umbrella, brolly?

     a.  American
     b.  British
10.  advertisment, commercial?

     a.  American
     b.  British
11.  cookie, biscuit?

     a.  American
     b.  British
12.  pudding, dessert?

     a.  American
     b.  British
13.  gully, gutter?

     a.  American
     b.  British
14.  house (one story), bungalow?

     a.  American
     b.  British
15.  loo, the toilet, bathroom?

     a.  American
     b.  British
16.  dustman, garbage man?

     a.  American
     b.  British
17.  cashier, bank teller?

     a.  American
     b.  British
18.  zee (letter), zed?

     a.  American
     b.  British
19.  can, tin?

     a.  American
     b.  British
20.  serviette, napkin?

     a.  American
     b.  British
21.  flog, sell?

     a.  American
     b.  British
22.  parade, carnival?

     a.  American
     b.  British
23.  candy, sweets?

     a.  American
     b.  British
24.  peckish, hungry?

     a.  American
     b.  British
25.  postbox, mailbox?

     a.  American
     b.  British
26.  refectory, cafeteria?

     a.  American
     b.  British
27.  traffic jam, tailback?

     a.  American
     b.  British
28.  charge call, collect call?

     a.  American
     b.  British
29.  jello, jelly?

     a.  American
     b.  British
30.  dollar bill, note?

     a.  American
     b.  British
31.  gasoline, petrol?

     a.  American
     b.  British
32.  postman, posty, mail carrier?

     a.  American
     b.  British
33.  living room, lounge?

     a.  American
     b.  British
34.  pence, cents?

     a.  American
     b.  British
35.  butty, sarny, sandwich?

     a.  American
     b.  British
36.  zip code, post code?

     a.  American
     b.  British
37.  eraser, rubber?

     a.  American
     b.  British
38.  mail, post?

     a.  American
     b.  British
39.  car park, parking lot?

     a.  American
     b.  British
40.  torch, flashlight?

     a.  American
     b.  British
41.  flannel, washcloth?

     a.  American
     b.  British
42.  line, queue?

     a.  American
     b.  British
43.  cocktail stick, toothpick?

     a.  American
     b.  British
44.  bleachers, terrace?

     a.  American
     b.  British
45.  dungarees, overalls?

     a.  American
     b.  British
46.  mackintosh, raincoat?

     a.  American
     b.  British
47.  vacation, holiday?

     a.  American
     b.  British
48.  clingfilm, plastic wrap?

     a.  American
     b.  British
49.  entree, starter, appetizer?

     a.  American
     b.  British
50.  chat show, talk show?

     a.  American
     b.  British
51.  bap, hamburger bun?

     a.  American
     b.  British
52.  cotton candy, candy floss?

     a.  American
     b.  British
53.  oven, cooker?

     a.  American
     b.  British
54.  football, soccer?

     a.  American
     b.  British
55.  pants, trousers?

     a.  American
     b.  British
56.  pastry base, pie crust?

     a.  American
     b.  British
57.  pullover, jumper, sweater?

     a.  American
     b.  British
58.  movie theater, cinema?

     a.  American
     b.  British
59.  hire, rent?

     a.  American
     b.  British
60.  overpass, flyover?

     a.  American
     b.  British
61.  suspenders, garter belt?

     a.  American
     b.  British
62.  tap, faucet?

     a.  American
     b.  British
63.  windscreen, windshield?

     a.  American
     b.  British
64.  fairy cake, cupcake?

     a.  American
     b.  British
65.  dear, expensive?

     a.  American
     b.  British
66.  license plate, number plate?

     a.  American
     b.  British
67.  pants, knickers, underwear?

     a.  American
     b.  British
68.  pavement, sidewalk?

     a.  American
     b.  British
69.  rubbish, trash?

     a.  American
     b.  British
70.  private school, public school?

     a.  American
     b.  British
71.  state school, public school?

     a.  American
     b.  British
72.  savoury biscuit, cracker?

     a.  American
     b.  British
73.  dressing gown, robe?

     a.  American
     b.  British
74.  vest, waistcoat?

     a.  American
     b.  British
75.  vest, undershirt?

     a.  American
     b.  British
76.  closet (bedroom), wardrobe?

     a.  American
     b.  British
77.  shopping cart/basket, trolley?

     a.  American
     b.  British
78.  glue, gum?

     a.  American
     b.  British
79.  picnic basket, picnic hamper?

     a.  American
     b.  British
80.  jacket potato, baked potato?

     a.  American
     b.  British
81.  estate agent, realtor?

     a.  American
     b.  British
82.  naturist, nudist?

     a.  American
     b.  British
83.  call (on the phone), ring?

     a.  American
     b.  British
84.  jelly, jam?

     a.  American
     b.  British
85.  lollipop man, crossing guard?

     a.  American
     b.  British
86.  bin, dustbin (outside), trash can?

     a.  American
     b.  British
87.  chemist, drugstore?

     a.  American
     b.  British
88.  pharmacist, chemist?

     a.  American
     b.  British
89.  wellingtons, wellies, golashes?

     a.  American
     b.  British
90.  dinner jacket, tuxedo?

     a.  American
     b.  British
91.  kiss (passionate), snog?

     a.  American
     b.  British
92.  tart, a flirt?

     a.  American
     b.  British
93.  squire, guv'nor, sir?

     a.  American
     b.  British
94.  ladybird, ladybug?

     a.  American
     b.  British
95.  semidetached house, duplex?

     a.  American
     b.  British
96.  on/off ramp, slip road?

     a.  American
     b.  British
97.  take-out (food), take-away?

     a.  American
     b.  British
98.  kitchen towel/paper, paper towel?

     a.  American
     b.  British
99.  motor/carriage way, freeway (expressway)?

     a.  American
     b.  British
100.  off licens, offy, liquor store?

     a.  American
     b.  British
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • 60 Second News - Beginner Level. A one minute video of recent world news. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great listening and reading practice. News stories are posted on weekdays only.
  • Learning English - Beginner Level. A 30 minute audio broadcast of recent world news. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great listening practice.
  • Conversation Lesson - Beginner Level. Let's Learn English conversation lesson with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, video speaking practice, video pronunciation practice, a new words section, and a writing activity.
60 Second News
(Beginner - Listening, Reading)

January 18, 2019

A one minute video of recent world news.
Great reading and listening practice.
The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed.
News stories are posted on weekdays only.
 
Learning English
(Beginner - Listening)

January 18, 2019 - A 30 minute audio broadcast of recent world news. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great listening practice.
 
Conversation Lesson 18 - She Always Does That
(Beginner - Conversation, Listening, Reading)

In this lesson Anna reads the news for the first time. She learns that there is a right way and a wrong way to read the news.
Lesson Video

Watch the video and then do the activities on this page.
Video Script

Anna: Hello, from Washington, D.C.! Today at work I am reading the news for the first time. I am really nervous. But my boss, Ms. Weaver, is here to help me.
Caty: Now, Anna, remember. When we read the news we are always reading facts. We never show our feelings.
Anna: Sure thing, Ms. Weaver.
Caty: Great. Are you ready?
Anna: Yes.
Caty: Okay, let’s try the first story!
Anna: Hello, and welcome to The News.
Anna: A new book is very popular with children and families. This is it.
Anna: It is about a lost duckling. The duck's mother cannot find him.
Caty: Stop! Anna, when you say the words “duck” and “duckling” you look really sad.
Anna: I do?
Caty: Yes. Sad is a feeling.
Anna: Sad is not a fact. Sorry. Let me try again.
Caty: Okay, she’s trying again! And go.
Anna: Hello, and welcome to The News. A new book is very popular with children and families. This is it.
Anna: It is about a lost duckling. The duck’s mother can not find ‘im. But a family gives him a home.
Caty: Stop! Anna, you are doing it again.
Anna: This story is very sad.
Caty: I have an idea. Let’s read the second story. She’s reading the second story. And … go!
Anna: Hello , and welcome to The News. In Indiana, a grandmother is the first 80-year-old woman to win The Race Car 500.
Anna: That is awesome!
Caty: Stop! Stop! Anna, please -- no feelings.
Anna: Right. But it is awesome that an 80-year-old grandmother wins a car race.
Caty: Just the facts, Anna.
Anna: Right.
Anna: Hello, and welcome to The News. In Indiana, a grandmother is the first 80-year-old woman to win The Race Car 500.
Anna: She rarely talks to reporters. But when she does, she often says, “Nothing can stop me now!”
Anna: I am very happy for her!
Caty: Stop, stop, stop!! Anna, you cannot say you are happy.
Anna: But I am happy.
Caty: But you can’t say it.
Anna: Why?
Caty: This is the News. Happy and sad are feelings. You can’t have them in The News.
Anna: Okay. I got it.
Caty: Okay. Let’s try the third story. She’s reading the third story!
Anna: Hello and welcome to The News.
City politicians in Big Town are using city money to have a big party on a cruise ship. They are taking the money for the party from the children’s library.
Anna: What?! That makes me very angry.
Caty: No, no, no! Anna, you cannot say you are angry! This is The News!!!
Anna: What can I do, Ms. Weaver? Take out my feelings and put them here … on the news desk?
Caty: Yes. Yes. That’s right! Now you’ve got it!
Caty: Let’s repeat the first story.
Anna: This is going to be a very long day.
Anna: Until next time!
Listening

Now practice listening to only the audio portion of the conversation.
Speaking

Anna reads the news for the first time. She learns that there is a right way and a wrong way to read the news.
Pronunciation

This video teaches about shortened forms of object pronouns that begin with a /th/ or /h/ sound. You also learn about two different ways to pronounce the "s" ending on verbs like "talks" and "says."
New Words
  • angryadj. having a strong feeling of being upset or annoyed
  • cruise shipn. a large ship that stops at different ports and carries passengers who are traveling for pleasure
  • deskn. a piece of furniture that is like a table and often has drawers
  • duckn. a bird that swims and has a flat beak, a short neck, a heavy body, short legs, and webbed feet
  • ducklingn. a young duck
  • factn. a true piece of information
  • feelingn. an emotional state or reaction
  • getv. to understand (something or someone)
  • Indianan. state of the U.S.
  • longadj. lasting or continuing for a great amount of time
  • lostadj. not knowing where you are or how to get to where you want to go
  • popularadj. liked or enjoyed by many people
  • race carn. a very fast car that is used in professional auto racing
  • rarelyadv. not very often
  • repeatv. to say (something) again
  • sadadj. not happy
  • storyn. a description of how something happened
  • throwv. to cause (something) to move out of your hand and through the air by quickly moving your arm forward
  • winv. to achieve victory in a fight, contest, game, etc.
Activity

In this lesson, Anna is nervous because she is reading the news for the first time. How do you feel when you do something for the first time? Write about it and tell us about yourself or a friend doing something at work or school for the first time. Write about it in the Facebook Comments section below. Use the Activity Sheet to practice writing and using ordinal numbers. Click lesson activity to get the printable PDF version. The page opens to a new window.
Conversation Lessons

Study all 52 English conversation lessons. Let's Learn English conversation lessons each with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, video speaking practice, video pronunciation practice, a new words section, and a writing activity. These lessons are for beginners.
Source: Voice of America
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Cool Stuff
Online Reference
Dictionary, Encyclopedia & more
Word:
by:
Confused?

Found a word in Fun Easy English you do not know?
1. Type the word in the Online Reference window
2. Click Look it up (opens to a new window)
Top Hits

Listen to American music while you study.
1. Click The ► button
2. Enjoy some great music
Resources

These links contain many English learning resources. Some are for students, some are for teachers. If you find information not on Fun Easy English, please post a comment below, and I will make every effort to add it to the site. Thanks.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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