Fun Easy English Classroom January 7
 
 
 
 

Classroom
Today


Introduction to English
grammar and parts
of speech
English Grammar and Parts of Speech

Today in the Fun Easy English classroom you will learn about English grammar and parts of speech. Yup grammar pretty much sucks in any language and English is no exception. Still you must know basic English grammar rules in order to effectively communicate. Watch the video at the end of this lesson for suggestions on good ways to study English.
Hey if you cannot understand something on this page,
then use the Fun Easy English dictionary (opens in a new window)
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Video: Grammar Introduction
 
Video: Grammar Comedy Introducing Mr. A. Lee En
Grammar: Parts of Speech

Parts of speech explain how words are used in English and are grouped into eight categories.
  • noun - refers to a person, animal, place, thing, object, substance, state, event, feeling, or abstract idea
  • pronoun - takes the place of a noun or a noun phrase
  • verb - refers to an action (do, eat, talk) or a state (be, like, own)
  • adverb - modifies the meaning of other words including: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, phrases, sentences
  • adjective - modifies, or describes, a noun or a pronoun
  • preposition - connects a noun, pronoun, or phrase to other words in a sentence
  • conjunction - connects phrases, clauses, or other words
  • interjection - used mostly in speech to show emotion, gain attention, exclaim, protest, or command
 
Video: Grammar Parts of Speech
From YOUR Teacher: Parts of Speech

This is the base of English grammar and the place for you to begin your studies.
 
Test: Grammar Parts of Speech

Review the parts of speech above. Decide which of the parts of speech each word in bold print in the test sentences represents.
1.  John ate lunch in the school cafeteria.

     a.  noun
     b.  pronoun
     c.  verb
     d.  adverb
2.  Jane shopped with her friends.

     a.  noun
     b.  pronoun
     c.  verb
     d.  adverb
3.  Your wallet is on the bed.

     a.  adjective
     b.  preposition
     c.  conjunction
     d.  interjection
4.  She likes to watch TV after work.

     a.  noun
     b.  pronoun
     c.  verb
     d.  adverb
 5.  Hey, sit down and be quiet.

     a.  adjective
     b.  preposition
     c.  conjunction
     d.  interjection
6.  They spent all their vacation money.

     a.  noun
     b.  pronoun
     c.  verb
     d.  adverb
7.  They hiked quickly up the mountain.

     a.  noun
     b.  pronoun
     c.  verb
     d.  adverb
8.  She is a beautiful actress.

     a.  adjective
     b.  preposition
     c.  conjunction
     d.  interjection
9.  They ordered more food but then ate nothing.

     a.  adjective
     b.  preposition
     c.  conjunction
     d.  interjection
10.  The park looks beautiful this time of year.

     a.  noun
     b.  pronoun
     c.  verb
     d.  adverb
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • 60 Second News - Beginner Level. A one minute video of recent world news. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great listening and reading practice. News stories are posted on weekdays only.
  • Learning English - Beginner Level. A 30 minute audio broadcast of recent world news. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great listening practice.
  • Conversation Lesson - Beginner Level. Let's Learn English conversation lesson with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, video speaking practice, video pronunciation practice, a new words section, and a writing activity.
  • Today in History - Advanced Level. Important events which changed history in America and around the world. Great English reading practice.
60 Second News
(Beginner - Listening, Reading)

January 7, 2019

A one minute video of recent world news.
Great reading and listening practice.
The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed.
News stories are posted on weekdays only.
 
Learning English

(Beginner - Listening)

January 7, 2019 - A 30 minute audio broadcast of recent world news. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great listening practice.
 
Conversation Lesson 7 - What Are You Doing?

In this lesson Anna is starting her work at The News. She goes around the office meeting her co-workers. She learns they are all busy.
Lesson Video

Watch the video and then do the activities on this page.
Video Script

Caty: Come in.
Caty: Well, Anna, welcome.
Anna: Thank you.
Caty: I am your boss, Caty Weaver. But, please call me Caty.
Anna: Thank you, Ms. Weaver.
Caty: Just Caty.
Anna: Sure thing, Ms. Weaver.
Caty: Okay then. Are you excited?
Anna: Yes, I am excited!
Caty: So sorry, but I am busy. Please meet your co-workers. But remember, they are busy working.
Anna: Sure. Thanks, Ms. Weaver.
Anna: Hi there! I’m Anna.
Anne: Hi, Anna. I’m Anne.
Anna: Nice to meet you. What are you doing?
Anne: Um, I’m writing.
Anna: You are writing! You are writing a lot!
Anna: (Spills papers) Oh! Oh dear.
Anne: No! No! That's okay.
Anna: I am sorry!
Anne: That’s okay. Really.
Anna: I am sorry!
Anne: Please. Please. Please stop. Please.
Anna: Sorry. Sorry.
Jonathan: (in the studio) “and people all around the world are waiting to hear news about the next president…”
Anna: Jonathan, hi! Remember me? I live in your building.
Jonathan: Oh. Uh. Hi, Anna.
Anna: What are you doing?
Jonathan: I am doing my show!
Anna: Oh, sorry. Are you recording?
Jonathan: Yes! And, now I have to record again!
Anna: Sorry. Have a good show.
Jonathan: Thank you.
Anna: Sorry.
Amelia: The word of the day is social. Social -
Anna: Oh! Hi!
Amelia: - is an adjective.
Anna: Hi! I’m Anna!
Amelia: Hi. I’m Amelia.
Anna: Nice to meet you!
Anna: What are you doing?
Amelia: I’m reading.
Anna: Are you reading the news? Hi!
Amelia: No, I’m reading for my show.
Amelia: (to camera person) Can I read again?
Anna: Sorry.
Anna: This day is not going well.
Caty: Anna! Hi! What’re you doing?
Anna: I am bothering people, Ms. Weaver.
Caty: Let’s go to my office and talk.
Anna: I like to talk with you, Ms. Weaver.
Caty: It’s Caty.
Anna: Right. Thanks ... Ms. Weaver
Listening

Now practice listening to only the audio portion of the conversation.
Speaking

In this video, learn to say the new words. Also, learn how to use the Present Continuous tense and ask questions to clarify.
Pronunciation

In this video, you learn about how Americans shorten verbs in the Present Continuous tense. You will also learn a shorter form of the question phrase, "What are you doing?"
New Words
  • bossn. the person whose job is to tell other workers what to do
  • botherv. to annoy someone or to cause someone to feel annoyed
  • busyadj. actively doing something
  • excitedadj. very enthusiastic and eager about something
  • nervousadj. having or showing feelings of being worried and afraid about what might happen
  • newsn. information that is reported in a newspaper, magazine, or a television news program
  • officen. a building or room in which people work at desks doing business or professional activities
  • readv. to look at and understand the meaning of letters, words, symbols, etc.
  • recordv. to store (something, such as sounds, music, images, etc.) on tape or on a disk so that it can be heard or seen later
  • shown. a television or radio program
  • workv. to do things as part of your job
  • writev. to create (a book, poem, story, etc.) by writing words on paper or on a computer
Activity

What are you doing now? What are your friends doing? Here is an example: "I am reading and my friends are listening to music." Write about it in the Facebook Comments section below. Do the activity and practice writing the activity words. Click lesson activity to get the printable PDF version. The page opens to a new window.
Conversation Lessons

Study all 52 English conversation lessons. Let's Learn English conversation lessons each with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, video speaking practice, video pronunciation practice, a new words section, and a writing activity. These lessons are for beginners.
Source: Voice of America
 
Today in History
(Advanced - Reading)

January 7, 1891

Important events which changed history in America and around the world. Read the following story. Use the Online Reference window below to look up any words you do not know. This is great English reading practice.

Picture: [Portrait of Zora Neale Hurston]. Carl Van Vechten, photographer; Apr. 3, 1938. Van Vechten Collection. Prints & Photographs Division
Zora Neale Hurston

Novelist, folklorist, dramatist, and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston wrote in her memoir, Dust Tracks on a Road, that she was born on January 7, 1891, in Eatonville, Florida, the first incorporated black town in the United States. She may have taken creative license with this fact as more recent scholarship indicates she was born in Notasulga, Alabama and probably on January 15th. Hurston did move to Eatonville when she was a toddler and the dialects, customs, and folklore of the people of Eatonville and of rural Florida informed Hurston’s work throughout her career.

Hurston studied at Morgan Academy, the preparatory school of Morgan College, then at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She won a scholarship to Barnard College where she studied anthropology with Franz Boas and earned her bachelor of arts degree while participating in the flourishing Harlem Renaissance. She collected folklore and made recordings in Florida and other areas of the South in the late 1920s. During the Depression, she helped Alan Lomax, the son of pioneer folksong collector John Avery Lomax, document the folk music of Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas. Later, she worked with the Federal Writer’s Project interviewing Floridians about their lives and culture and recording and collecting the diverse folk songs of her native state—a project she described as “an opportunity to observe the wombs of folk culture still heavy with life.”

Her ethnographic work also took her beyond the United States. She traveled the Caribbean— to Haiti and Jamaica to study folklore and customs—and to Honduras to study black communities. Hurston assembled and published the information she gathered on Haitian and Jamaican voodoo in her book Tell My Horse (1938). Even though her pursuits led her many places, she always returned to Florida. She invoked the spirit and voice of her people by seamlessly weaving the songs, stories, and other information she collected in her studies into her fiction.

Zora Neale Hurston’s wide-ranging interests as well as economic need led her to take an astounding variety of positions. She had short tenures as a manicurist, a librarian, a dramatic coach with the The New Deal Federal Theatre Project 1935-1939, a story consultant at Paramount Pictures, a maid, and a teacher.

In 1959, after suffering a stroke, Hurston was forced to enter a welfare home where she died in 1960. She was buried in an unmarked grave and her work languished in relative obscurity until 1975, when Alice Walker published the article “In Search of Zora Neale Hurston” in Ms. magazine. In the article, Walker recounts her experiences of searching for, finding, and marking Hurston’s grave.

Hurston is best known for her novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), but she also published folklore collections, the autobiography Dust Tracks On a Road (1942), and plays. In 1997, an historian at the Library of Congress and a former staffer/scholar discovered ten unpublished Hurston plays which Hurston had initially deposited in the Library for copyright protection. Among the plays are sketches, full-length comedies and dramas, and a libretto. The works incorporate the folk songs and dances that figure prominently in Hurston’s fiction. Though her play The Great Day had been produced on Broadway, prior to this discovery Hurston had been perceived as a novelist who had written plays; when, in fact, she clearly invested a great deal of her creativity in these works. Now scholars understand that the scope of her accomplishments is even greater than previously understood.
Source: Library of Congress
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
Cool Stuff
Online Reference
Dictionary, Encyclopedia & more
Word:
by:
Confused?

Found a word in Fun Easy English you do not know?
1. Type the word in the Online Reference window
2. Click Look it up (opens to a new window)
Top Hits

Listen to American music while you study.
1. Click The ► button
2. Enjoy some great music
Resources

These links contain many English learning resources. Some are for students, some are for teachers. If you find information not on Fun Easy English, please post a comment below, and I will make every effort to add it to the site. Thanks.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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