Fun Easy English Classroom March 13
 
 
 
 

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wanna
American English Reduction "wanna"

Today in the Fun Easy English classroom you are going to learn "wanna" an American English reduction.
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Reductions: "wanna"

American English reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • This American English reduction is formed when you combine and reduce the following words.
  • wanna = want + to
  • This American English reduction is used in the following way.
  • I really wanna find a better job.
  • This American English reduction has the following meaning.
  • I really want to find a better job.
Examples: "wanna" (reading and reductions)
  • Do you wanna hang out together today?
  • (Meaning: Do you want to do something together today?)
  • Does she wanna move to San Diego, California?
  • (Meaning: Does she want to move to San Diego, California?)
  • Does he wanna go to the game today?
  • (Meaning: Does he want to go to the game today?)
  • I really wanna ask her out on a date.
  • (Meaning: I really want to ask her out on a date.)
  • We wanna go with you.
  • (Meaning: We want to go with you.)
From YOUR Teacher: Wanna and Kids

Travel to America and visit a playground for kids. You will be able to listen to the reduction "wanna" over and over.
I wanna eat some snacks.
I wanna play longer.
Note: Reductions

Remember the following:
  • Reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • Reductions, such as wanna are not real words in English.
  • You need to use reductions in order to sound more natural.
  • You need to know reductions in order to understand conversations between native English speakers.
  • Reductions are used extensively in American TV, movies, music, literature, and in conversations among native English speakers.
Reductions in Music and TV


Britney Spears - I Wanna Go

Songwriters: Savan Kotecha / Max Martin / Johan Schuster
I Wanna Go lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Britney Jean Spears (born December 2, 1981) is an American singer, songwriter, dancer, and actress. Born in McComb, Mississippi and raised in Kentwood, Louisiana, she appeared in stage productions and television series, before signing with Jive Records in 1997. Spears's first two studio albums, ...Baby One More Time (1999) and Oops!... I Did It Again (2000), were global successes and made her the best-selling teenage artist of all-time. Referred to as the "Princess of Pop", Spears was credited with influencing the revival of teen pop during the late 1990s and early 2000s.

This video is a good example of the usage of "wanna", an English language reduction.

Use a dictionary to look up words you do not understand.
Lyrics

Lately I've been stuck imagining
What I wanna do and what I really think
Time to blow out
Be a little inappropriate
'Cause I know that everybody's thinking it
When the lights out
Shame on me
To need release
Uncontrollably
I I I wanna go o o all the way ay ay
Taking out my freak tonight
I I I wanna show o o
All the dir ir irt
I got running through my mind
Whoa oh oh
I I I wanna go o o all the way ay ay
Taking out my freak tonight
I I I wanna show o o
All the dir ir irt
I got running through my mind
Lately people got me all tied up
There's a countdown waiting for me to erupt
Time to blow out
I've been told who I should do it with
To keep both my hands above the blanket
When the lights out
Shame on me
To need release
Uncontrollably
I I I wanna go o o all the way ay ay
Taking out my freak tonight
I I I wanna show o o
All the dir ir irt
I got running through my mind
I I I wanna go o o all the way ay ay
Taking out my freak tonight
I I I wanna show o o
All the dir ir irt
I got running through my mind
Whoa oh oh
Shame, on me (shame on me)
To need, release (to need, release)
Uncontrollably (uncontrollably lably lably lably)
I I I wanna go o o all the way ay ay
Taking out my freak tonight
I I I wanna show o o
All the dir ir irt
I got running through my mind
I I I wanna go o o all the way ay ay
Taking out my freak tonight
I I I wanna show o o
All the dir ir irt
I got running through my mind
Whoa oh oh


Jet - Are You Gonna Be My Girl

Songwriters: Cameron Thane Muncey / Nicholas John Cester
Are You Gonna Be My Girl lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

Jet are an Australian rock band formed in 2001. The band consists of lead guitarist Cameron Muncey, bassist Mark Wilson, and brothers Nic and Chris Cester on vocals/rhythm guitar and drums respectively. The group sold 6.5 million albums. The band dissolved in 2012, but reformed in 2016.

This video is a good example of the usage of "gonna", and "wanna" English language reductions.

Use a dictionary to look up words you do not understand.
Lyrics

Go!
So one, two, three, take my hand and come with me
Because you look so fine
That I really wanna make you mine
I say you look so fine
That I really wanna make you mine
Oh, four, five, six c'mon and get your kicks
Now you don't need that money
When you look like that, do ya honey
Big black boots
Long blonde hair
She's so sweet
With her get back stare
Well I could see
You home with me
But you were with another man, yeah!
I know we
Ain't got much to say
Before I let you get away, yeah!
I said, are you gonna be my girl?
Well, so one, two, three, take my hand and come with me
Because you look so fine
That I really wanna make you mine
I say you look so fine
That I really wanna make you mine
Oh, four, five, six c'mon and get your kicks
Now you don't need that money
With a face like that, do ya
Big black boots
Long brown hair
She's so sweet
With her get back stare
Well I could see
You home with me
But you were with another man, yeah!
I know we,
Ain't got much to say
Before I let you get away, yeah!
I said, are you gonna be my girl?
Oh yeah, oh yeah, c'mon!
I could see
You home with me
But you were with another man, yeah!
I know we
Ain't got much to say
Before I let you get away, yeah!
Uh, be my girl
Be my girl
Are you gonna be my girl?
Yeah
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • Conversation Lesson - Intermediate Level. Let's Learn English conversation lesson with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, and a new words section.
Conversation Lesson 20 - The Test Drive
(Intermediate - Conversation, Listening, Reading)

In this lesson Anna, Penelope and Rick are making a news story about the Washington Car Show. Anna is having a lot of fun - maybe too much fun.
Lesson Video

Watch the video and then read the video script.
Video Script

Anna: (to Penelope) That’s a great idea. (to Rick) Rick, I think we should use this as the opening shot.
Penelope: Anna, did Ms. Weaver give us instructions for covering the car show?
Anna: She did. She said that we need to show lots of cars. She said we need to interview people. And she also said that we should have fun.
Penelope: Those were her exact words?
Anna: Yeah. She said, “Have fun, Anna!” And she is the boss.
Anna: (to Rick) Okay, Rick, are you - are you ready? OK. Hello, I'm Anna Matteo. Welcome to the Washington Car Show!
Anna: People all over town are saying that if you like cars, this is the place to be! So, let's see what people are talking about. (at Rick) How was that? Okay? Is that Good?
Professor Bot: Anna, Penelope and Rick are making a news story about the Washington Car Show. Ms. Weaver gave them instructions.
We often need to tell others what someone else said.
There are two ways to do this. One is to use the person’s exact words and use quotation marks. We call this "direct speech."
For example, Ms. Weaver had said, “You need to show lots of cars.”
The other way is to talk about what someone said. We call this "reported speech."
Anna tells Penelope: She said that we need to show lots of cars.
In this sentence, "she," is the subject, “said” is the reporting verb, “that” is the conjunction and “we need to show lots of cars” is the reporting clause.
Keep watching, and listen for sentences where Anna talks about what someone else said!
Anna: This car show has many styles of vehicles. There are utility vehicles, classic cars, trucks, sports cars, and everyday vehicles.
Penelope: Okay, I think we got good interviews.
Anna: Me too! People had very different opinions. But they all said they loved cars.
Penelope: Anna, look -- a robot!
Anna: A robot!
Penelope: A robot!
Anna: Rick, we have to use the robot in the show!
(They walk over to the robot. Anna begins to dance like a robot.)
Robot: What is your first name?
Anna: Anna! Anna!
Robot: Anna, you know, what an effort. What an effort to robot dance. How about a round of applause for Anna! I’ve never seen anyone try so hard.
Anna: Penelope, did you hear that? Hank the Robot said that he has never seen anyone dance like me.
Penelope: Uh, I think many people here are saying that, Anna.
Anna: That was fun. You know what someone told me? You can test drive a Jaguar at this car show.
Penelope: Now, that sounds fun.
Anna: Let’s go.
Penelope: Okay.
Anna: This course is smooth. So you can drive faster.
Anna: He said...that I can’t drive, unfortunately.
(They begin the test drive. Kurt, the stunt driver, does the driving.)
Anna: Oh my gosh…reverse.
Anna: That was great. This is awesome.
Kurt: Are you ready to go on the rollercoaster?
Anna: I’m ready.
Kurt: Here we go!
Anna: That’s awesome.
Anna: That was...That was awesome! I just want to go one more time. I promise. That’s it. Just one more time.
Anna: This course is bumpy and uneven. I was told that I could drive this course. So I am.
Anna: (to Rick) Okay, Rick, are you rolling? Awesome. Okay, this course is uneven. But I think the ride will be smooth.
Anna: Ooh. This hill is really steep.
Anna: Oh my gosh. I can’t tell you how much fun this is.
Anna: Penelope, that was so much fun! I think I need to go again.
Penelope: Uh, Anna, I think we have enough test drive video.
Anna: Ms. Weaver said to get a lot. So, I think I should go again. (to Rick) Rick, I’m going to go again. Until next time!
Penelope: But I want to get lunch, Anna!
Professor Bot: Penelope said she wants to go to lunch. But I don’t think that’s going to happen soon. Visit our website for more!
Listening

Now practice listening to only the audio portion of the conversation.
Practice

Now, you try it! First, read about reported speech below. Then try changing a few of these sentences into reported speech:

Anna asked, "Rick, are you ready?"
Hank said, "I've never seen anyone try so hard."
Kurt asked, "Are you ready to go on the rollercoaster?"
Anna said, "This hill is really steep."
Penelope said, "I think we have enough test drive video."
Anna said, "I think I should go again."

Write your sentences in the Facebook Comments section below.
Reported Speech

We often need to tell others what someone else said. We can do this in two ways. One is to say the person’s exact words and use quotation marks. We call this “direct speech.” The other is to talk about what someone else said. We call this “reported speech.”
Direct Speech Reported Speech
“You need to show lots of cars.” She said (that) we need show lots of cars.
Reported speech contains a subject, reporting verb, conjunction and reporting clause. (The word “that” is optional.)
Subject noun or pronoun Reporting Verb Conjunction Reporting Clause
She said (that) we need to show lots of cars.
Using Reported Speech

To use reported speech, choose a reporting verb, such as say, tell or ask. Usually, the verb in direct speech moves one tense back in time in reported speech.
Direct Speech Reported Speech
“I drive my car every day.” She said (that) she drove her car every day.
“I am driving my car. She said (that) she was driving her car.
“I have driven my car.” She said (that) she had driven her car.
“I will drive my car.” She said (that) she would drive her car.
If the speaker is reporting something that was just said, the reporting clause is often in present tense. This is also common for general facts.
Direct Speech Reported Speech
“You need to show lots of cars.” She said (that) we need to show lots of cars.
“The sky is blue.” She said (that) the sky is blue.
The modals might, should, would, could and ought to do not change in reported speech. However, can, must and have to do change.
Direct Speech Reported Speech
“I can/could drive my car.” She said (that) she could drive her car.
“I may/might drive my car.” She said (that) she might drive her car.
“I must drive my car.” She said (that) she had to drive her car.
“I have to drive my car.” She said (that) she had to drive her car.
“I should drive my car.” She said (that) she should drive her car.
“I ought to drive my car.” She said (that) she ought to drive her car.
Change the point of view. For example, the subject “I” becomes “he” or “she” and the subject “we” becomes “they.”
Direct Speech Reported Speech
“I have two tickets to the Car Show.” He said (that) he had two tickets to the Car Show.
“We want to dance like Hank the Robot.” They said (that) they wanted to dance like Hank the Robot.
Use if or whether to report a “yes or no” question. And use the reporting verb “ask.”
Direct Speech Reported Speech
“Do you like the Washington Car Show?” She asked if/whether I liked the Washington Car Show.
New Words
  • bumpyadj. having or covered with bumps
  • classic carn. an older car, usually of a style that is no longer being manufactured
  • coursen. the path or direction that something or someone moves along
  • coverv. to report news about something
  • effortn. energy used to do something
  • everydayadv. used or seen everyday
  • exactadj. full or completely correct or accurate
  • hilln. a usually rounded area of land that is higher than the land around it but that is not as high as a mountain
  • opinionn. a belief, judgment, or way of thinking about something
  • rollv. to operate something, such as a movie camera
  • round of applauseexpression. an outburst of clapping among a group or audience
  • shotn. a part of a movie or a television show that is filmed by one camera without stopping​
  • smoothadj. having a flat, even surface
  • sports carn. a low-built car designed for performance at high speeds
  • steepadj. rising or falling sharply
  • stunt driver - n. a trained driver who drives vehicles for dangerous scenes in films and on television
  • test drive - v. an act of driving a motor vehicle that one is considering buying in order to determine its quality
  • unevenadj. not level, flat or smooth
  • unfortunatelyadv. a word used to say that something is bad or disappointing
  • utility vehiclen. a powerful vehicle with four-wheel drive that can be driven over rough ground (also called sport utility vehicle or SUV)
  • vehiclen. a machine that is used to carry people or goods from one place to another
Conversation Lessons

Study all 30 English intermediate conversation lessons. Let's Learn English conversation lessons each with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, and a new words section. These lessons are for intermediate students.
Conversation Lessons

Study all 52 English beginner conversation lessons. Let's Learn English conversation lessons each with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, video speaking practice, video pronunciation practice, a new words section, and a writing activity. These lessons are for beginning students.
Source: Voice of America
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
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