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English reduction
gimme
American English Reduction "gimme"

Today in the Fun Easy English classroom you are going to learn "gimme" an American English reduction.
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Reductions: "gimme"

American English reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • This American English reduction is formed when you combine and reduce the following words.
  • gimme = give + me
  • This American English reduction is used in the following way.
  • Please gimme the book.
  • This American English reduction has the following meaning.
  • Please give me the book.
Examples: "gimme"
  • Gimme a good reason to invite you to the party.
  • (Meaning: Give me a good reason to invite you to the party.)
  • Gimme more of the fried potatoes.
  • (Meaning: Give me more of the friend potatoes.)
  • Gimme a lot of the sauce.
  • (Meaning: Give me a lot of the sauce.)
  • Gimme your thoughts about my new girlfriend.
  • (Meaning: Tell me what you think about my new girlfriend.)
  • Gimme your love.
  • (Meaning: Give me your love.)
From YOUR Teacher: Gimme

This reduction is used a lot especially with kids in America.
Gimme the football.
Can you gimme something to eat now?
Note: Reductions

Remember the following:
  • Reductions are reduced forms of English words.
  • Reductions, such as gimme are not real words in English.
  • You need to use reductions in order to sound more natural.
  • You need to know reductions in order to understand conversations between native English speakers.
  • Reductions are used extensively in American TV, movies, music, literature, and in conversations among native English speakers.
Reductions in Music and TV


Britney Spears - Gimme More

Songwriters: James David Washington / Keri Lynn Hilson / Floyd Hills / Marcella Araica
Gimme More lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group

Britney Jean Spears (born December 2, 1981) is an American singer, songwriter, dancer, and actress. Born in McComb, Mississippi and raised in Kentwood, Louisiana, she appeared in stage productions and television series, before signing with Jive Records in 1997. Spears's first two studio albums, ...Baby One More Time (1999) and Oops!... I Did It Again (2000), were global successes and made her the best-selling teenage artist of all-time. Referred to as the "Princess of Pop", Spears was credited with influencing the revival of teen pop during the late 1990s and early 2000s.

This video is a good example of the usage of "gimme", and "gonna" English language reductions.

Use a dictionary to look up words you do not understand.
Lyrics

Every time they turn the lights down
Just want to go that extra mile for you
You public display of affection
Feels like no one else in the room (but you)
We can get down like there's no one around
We'll keep on rockin' (We'll keep on rockin')
We'll keep on rockin' (Keep on rockin')
Cameras are flashin' while we're dirty dancin'
They keep watching (They keep watching)
Keep watching
Feels like the crowd is saying
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
A center of attention (Can you feel them?)
Even when we're up against the wall
You've got me in a crazy position (yeah)
If you're on a mission (uh-uh)
You got my permission (oh)
We can get down like there's no one around
We'll keep on rockin' (Keep on rockin')
We'll keep on rockin', rockin' (Oh ah ha)
Cameras are flashin' while we're dirty dancin'
They keep watching (They keep watching)
Keep watching
Feel's like the crowd is saying:
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More (Gimme more)
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More (Oh woah oh!)
Gimme, Gimme more
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme more (Gimme more, yeah)
Gimme, More
Gimme, Gimme, More
Give me more, give me more
Give me more, give me more babe (Danja Danja, Danj)
I just want more!
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme, Gimme
Gimme,
Gimme, Gimme
Bet you didn't see this one comin
The incredible ligo
The legendary Ms. Britney Spears
And the unstoppable Danja
You're gonna have to remove me
Cause I ain't goin nowhere
 
Additional Lessons
About These Lessons

The following classroom lessons are great for students who want additional conversation, listening, and reading practice. Please post a comment at the bottom of this page in the Facebook Comments window with your thoughts about these lessons.
  • Conversation Lesson - Intermediate Level. Let's Learn English conversation lesson with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, and a new words section.
Conversation Lesson 24 - I Feel Super!
(Intermediate - Conversation, Listening, Reading)

In this lesson Anna gets hit by lightning and, suddenly, can do amazing things. Or can she?
Lesson Video

Watch the video and then read the video script.
Video Script

ANNA: Hi! I see you like superhero culture. Me too.
ANNA: In fact, tonight I’m going to the big superhero convention. Are you going?
YOUNG MAN: Um, I don’t know.
ANNA: Well, you'd better decide soon. Last year, it sold out.
ANNA: So, since we’re talking about superheroes: would you rather become a superhero by accident, like Spiderman, or be born a superhero, like Wonder Woman?
ANNA: Take your time. It’s a big question. I thought about it for days –
YOUNG MAN: Okay. If I had to choose, I’d rather be born a superhero.
ANNA: I’d rather become a superhero by an unexpected accident!
YOUNG MAN: Aren’t all accidents unexpected?
ANNA: Well, yeah.
YOUNG MAN: What was that!? Are you okay?
ANNA: I'm better than okay. I feel super!
PROF. BOT: Oh No! Anna was just hit by lightning. She had better get help.
PROF. BOT: We use had better to give advice. It is very informal and stronger than should and ought to. For example, Anna says: “You'd better decide soon. Last year, it sold out.”
PROF. BOT: When we use had better, we usually shorten the word had for personal pronouns.
PROF. BOT: We use would rather to say what we or someone else prefers to do or have. For example, the boy says: “Okay. If I had to choose, I’d rather be born a superhero.
PROF. BOT: With would rather, we also shorten the word would when used with personal pronouns. Keep watching and listen for had better and would rather.
YOUNG MAN: You’d better see a doctor.
ANNA: I’ve never felt better!
YOUNG MAN: You were just struck by lightning!! And what happened to your hair and your clothes?
ANNA: I don't know. Wait, I do know. This is my super suit! And this is my origin story.
YOUNG MAN: What are you talking about?
ANNA: An origin story tells the beginning of a superhero. You should know that.
YOUNG MAN: You're not making any sense, lady.
ANNA: I would rather be called Lightning Bolt Lady! It’ll sound great in a theme song: Lightning Bolt Lady!
ANNA: Now, I need to find my superpowers --
YOUNG MAN: Um, I really think --
ANNA: Wait. Don’t tell me. I’ll read your mind. You are thinking you’d like to be my super helper.
YOUNG MAN: I was not thinking that.
ANNA: ... that you’d like to live in a treehouse.
YOUNG MAN: No.
ANNA: … that you should eat more vegetables.
YOUNG MAN: Please, stop talking. You really should get some help.
ANNA: Mind reading is not my superpower. Maybe I can become invisible. I … am … invisible!
ANNA: You can’t see me. Who am I? I’m not here. You can’t see me.
YOUNG MAN: I can see you and so can everybody else.
ANNA: No power of invisibility. Maybe I can create a force field. I feel it working. Nothing can hurt –
(Someone throws a piece of paper and it hits her head.)
ANNA: Ow, that wasn’t very nice. I see I have a lot of work to do. Well, goodbye, non-super person!
YOUNG MAN: Wait. I’d better go with you. You might get worse…if that’s even possible.
ANNA: That's very nice of you, ordinary human. But I’d rather go by myself. This is a quest.
YOUNG MAN: Every time you speak, I get more confused.
ANNA: A quest is a part of all superhero stories. You really need to work on your superhero studies. Now, stand back. I’ve never flown before.
YOUNG MAN: And you’re not flying now.
ANNA: Flying is also not my superpower. That’s too bad. It's going to be expensive to Uber everywhere. You know, I'd rather walk. It’s a nice day. Goodbye, non-super person.
YOUNG MAN: I am not talking to strangers again.
ANNOUNCER: Will Lightning Bolt Lady find her superpowers … ever? Ouch! Did that brick wall hurt? Will the young man ever talk to a stranger again?
ANNOUNCER: Find out on the next episode of Let’s Learn English!
Listening

Now practice listening to only the audio portion of the conversation.
Practice
Now, you try it!

First, read about had better and would rather below. Then, write one sentences using each.

Use had better to give Anna advice about being a superhero
Use would rather to tell us what superpowers you prefer

For example, "I would rather be able to fly than make a force field."

Had Better / Would Rather

We use the modal had better to give advice and would rather to tell someone about preferences.

When you see a pronoun with 'd after it, the 'd can be short for either had or would. For example, sometimes I'd means I had. Other times, I'd it means I would. Read more below.

Had Better

We use had better to give advice. It is stronger than should and ought to. It tells us that there may be consequences if a person doesn’t take the advice.

Examples:

You had better decide soon. Last year, it sold out.
(Consequence: The conference might sell out.)

Anna had better be careful with her superpowers!
(Consequence: Someone could get hurt.)

The verb form is always had (not have) and we use a simple verb after had better. We also usually shorten had with personal pronouns:

I’d / you'd / he'd / she'd / we'd / they'd better…
subject had better simple verb
I ‘d better go
You ‘d better see
Sometimes, we use had better to show urgency. This is a more polite way to use it.

Examples:

I’d better go with you. You might get worse.
(Urgency: You might really need help.)

You'd better see a doctor.
(Urgency: You are hurt and must see a doctor.)

Would Rather

We use would rather to say what someone prefers to do or have. It is very common in spoken English.

We also shorten the word would with personal pronouns: I'd / you'd / he'd / she'd / we'd / they'd rather…
subject would rather simple verb
I ‘d rather be born
She ‘d rather become
We also use would rather to say what one person prefers some other person do. When we do this, the subject and object are different.
subject would rather object past participle
The young man would rather Anna left
When we compare two or more things in the same sentence, we use the word than.
first thing than second thing
I would rather be born a superhero than become one by accident.
For questions, notice that the subject comes between would and rather. Example: Would you rather be able to fly or make a force field?
Test Yourself

How well do you know the grammar from Level 2? Test yourself!

In Lesson 24, you will see examples of grammar that you have learned in Level 2. Look for sentences in Lesson 24 with:

Passive voice
Prepositions
Reflexive pronouns
Any grammar from Lessons 1 - 23

Then, write those sentences in the Comments section. For example: Passive Voice: Aren't all accidents unexpected?
New Words
  • announcern. a person who gives information on television or radio
  • becomev. to begin to be or come to be something
  • brickn. a small, hard block of baked clay that is used to build structures, such as houses, and sometimes to make streets
  • by accidentexpression. in a way that is not planned or intended
  • createv. to make or produce something
  • conventionn. a large meeting of people who come to a place for usually several days to talk about their shared work or other interests
  • consequencen. something that happens as a result of a particular action or set of conditions
  • decidev. to make a choice about something
  • force fieldn. an invisible or transparent shield of energy that some superheroes produce as a form of protection
  • humann. a person
  • invisibleadj. impossible to see
  • lightningn. the flashes of light that are produced in the sky during a storm
  • origin storyn. a story that informs the identity and motivations of heroes and villains in a comic book
  • preferv. to like someone or something better than someone or something else
  • powern. physical force or strength
  • questn. a journey made in search of something
  • standv. to be in an upright position with all of your weight on your feet
  • superheron. a fictional character who has amazing powers, such as the ability to fly
  • superpowern. a special power that only superheroes have
  • super suitn. the special clothing that a superhero wears
  • theme song – a piece of music from a television program or film that is remembered as the music that represents that program or film
  • Uberv. to ride in an Uber car
  • unexpectedadj. not expected
  • urgencyn. something that is very important and needs immediate attention
  • walln. the structure that forms the side of a room or building
Conversation Lessons

Study all 30 English intermediate conversation lessons. Let's Learn English conversation lessons each with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, and a new words section. These lessons are for intermediate students.
Conversation Lessons

Study all 52 English beginner conversation lessons. Let's Learn English conversation lessons each with a conversation video, a video script, audio listening practice, video speaking practice, video pronunciation practice, a new words section, and a writing activity. These lessons are for beginning students.
Source: Voice of America
Additional Information
Study Tips
(Beginner - Listening)

Avoid Ineffective Study Methods. An audio lesson to help you study English more effectively. The English is spoken at 75% of normal speed. Great English study tips.
Click here to visit the lesson page with the written script for this audio program.
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